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First Tooth Club - Burlington Pediatric Dentist
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First Tooth Club

Congratulations on the arrival of your little one’s first tooth! This is an exciting and maybe even confusing time as you navigate how to best care for those new pearly whites. This page is dedicated to you and your infant and how to keep their teeth and mouth healthy and cavity free. Each category below is just for you!

  • Preventative Dentistry

    Preventative Dentistry

    The importance of proper oral hygiene and preventative care for infants and small children cannot be overstated.

    Every Pediatric Dentist Practices Preventative Dentistry – it is the foundation of the specialty. Pediatric dentists are uniquely trained to insure your child a healthy and happy smile.

     

     

    What is Preventative Dentistry?

    Preventative Dentistry encompasses: brushing, dental development, flossing, fluoride, oral habits, orthodontics, parent involvement, proper diet, sealants, sports safety.

     

     

    Why is Preventative Dentistry important?

    Preventative dentistry means a healthy smile for your child. Children with healthy mouths chew more easily and gain more nutrients from the foods they eat. They learn to speak more quickly and clearly. They have a better chance of general health, because disease in the mouth can endanger the rest of the body. Finally, preventative dentistry means less extensive and less expensive treatment for your child.

     

     

    When should Preventative Dentistry start?

    Preventative dentistry begins with the first tooth. Visit your pediatric dentist at the eruption of the first tooth or by age one. The earlier the dental visit, the better the chance of preventing dental disease and helping your child build a cavity-free smile.

  • First Dental Visit

    When should my child first see a dentist?

    “First tooth first visit or by age 1” sums it up. Your child should visit a pediatric dentist when the first tooth comes in, usually between 6 and 12 months of age. This will establish a dental home for your child. Early examination and preventive care will protect your child’s smile now and in the future. If your child has turned 1 and no teeth have erupted, it is also best to visit the dentist to check in one whether teeth are on their way or if there is development concerns.

     

     

    Why so early? What dental problems could a baby have?

    The most important reason is to begin a thorough prevention program. Dental problems can begin early. A big concern is Early Childhood Caries. Once a child’s diet includes anything besides breast-milk, erupted teeth are at risk for decay. The earlier the dental visit, the better the chance of preventing dental problems.

  • Brushing, Flossing, & Fluoride

    When should I start cleaning my baby’s teeth?

    The sooner the better! Starting at birth, clean your child’s gums with a soft infant toothbrush or cloth and water. As soon as the teeth begin to appear, start brushing twice daily with a soft, age-appropriate sized toothbrush. Remember that young children do not have the ability to brush their teeth effectively. As Dr. Daniel likes to say, if your child is still struggling to eat with a knife and fork like royalty or tying their shoes, than they still need help brushing their teeth!

     

     

    Do baby teeth need to be flossed?

    The simple answer is, if your baby has two teeth that are touching they need flossing! If there is a tooth surface, like the side of the tooth that the toothbrush cannot get to, it has to be cleaned in another way and floss is the best way to do so. Any two teeth touching in your baby or young child’s mouth needs a good flossing. Dr. Daniel gives each patient floss sticks to take home as we find this the easiest way to get between those little pearly whites.

     

     

    Baby Teeth and Fluoride

    The clearest answer on when to start using fluoridated toothpaste is to have your child’s pediatric dentist assess their cavity risk. It is this assessment that will determine the earliest or latest timelines to introduce fluoridated toothpaste into your child’s daily dental care routine. At each visit, Dr. Daniel will asses this need and give guidance on how to use it, when to use it, and how much to use.

  • Thumb, Finger, & Pacifier Habits

    Why do children suck on fingers, pacifiers or other objects?

    This type of sucking is completely normal for babies and young children. It provides security. For young babies, it is a way to make contact with an learn about the world. In fact, babies begin to sucks on their fingers and thumbs even before they are born.

     

     

    Thumb and Finger Sucking

    Most children stop sucking on thumbs, pacifiers or other objects on their own between 2 and 4 years of age. However, some children continue these habits over long periods of time. In these children, the upper front teeth may tip toward the lip or not come in properly. Frequent or intense habits over a prolonged period of time can affect the way the child’s teeth bite together, as well as the growth of the jaws and bones that support the teeth.

    Thumb and finger sucking is perfectly normal for infants; many stop by age 2. Prolonged thumb sucking can create crooked teeth or bite problems. If the habit continues beyond age 3, a professional evaluation by a pediatric dentist is recommended. Dr. Daniel will be glad to suggest ways to address a prolonged thumb sucking habit.

     

     

    Are these habits bad for the teeth and jaws?

    Most children stop sucking on thumbs, pacifiers or other objects on their own between 2 and 4 years of age. However, some children continue these habits over long periods of time. In these children, the upper front teeth may tip toward the lip or not come in properly. Frequent or intense habits over a prolonged period of time can affect the way the child’s teeth bite together, as well as the growth of the jaws and bones that support the teeth.

     

     

    When should I worry about a sucking habit?

    Pediatric Dentists are the best professionals to handle these concerns. Dr. Daniel will carefully watch the way your child’s teeth erupt and jaws develop, keeping the sucking habit in mind at all times. Because persistent habits may cause long term problems, intervention may be recommended for children beyond 3 years of age.

     

     

    Are pacifiers a safer habit for the teeth than thumbs or fingers?

    Thumb, finger and pacifier sucking affect the teeth and jaws in essentially the same way. However, a pacifier habit often is easier to break. There is also some new pacifier technology on the market today that will make less of an impact on your child’s dental development. Dr. Daniel can recommend some awesome new products.

  • Nutrition

    Breastfeeding Only

    Breastfeeding and other foods

  • Teething

    Gum Care

    From six months to age 3, your child may have tender gums when teeth erupt. Many children like a clean teething ring, cool spoon or cold wet wash-cloth. Some parents swear by a chilled ring; others simply rub the baby’s gums with a clean finger.

  • Tongue Tie

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Contact Us

5061 New Street Suite 201
Burlington, ON L7L 1V1
Email: info@mybpd.ca
Office: (905) 592-1172
Fax: (905) 592-1453

Office Hours

MonTue 8am – 4pm | Wed 10am – 6pm

Thu 8am – 4pm | Fri 8am – 4pm | Sat*8am – 12pm

Sun Crusin’ The Trails! *We are open one Saturday per month, call to inquire about an appointment

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